Winter Storm…The Latest

December 19th, 2012 at 12:16 pm by under Weather

Storm Track for Winter Storm from the “American Model” or GFS model

Here is the latest track which does take the heaviest snowfall from this weather system north of our area. Snowfall of more than a foot will fall across southern Wisconsin and northern Michigan.

There are some interesting complications for us with this weather system. The lake effect snow machine will begin to turn on early Friday that will bring very heavy snow fall to areas around Lake Michigan.

Snowfall estimates for Thursday/Friday snowfall

Here is a look at what Futurecast has forecast through early Friday morning. This is the low pressure related to this system. It may warm the atmosphere for about 3 hours limiting the snowfall with see across NE Indiana.

Warming briefly as low moves through Friday AM

This is an interesting scenario and we call it a trowel in meteorology. Basically, it shows that the air will briefly warm up around low pressure. If you want the technical definition click on the link. It will be interesting what the future models will bring over the next 24 hours. The scenario will change but I’m fairly certain that the heaviest snow will be north and west of our area, except for the lake effect areas.

2 Responses to “Winter Storm…The Latest”

  1. Pete says:

    Man, I wish I had this when I was in school! I took a meteorology course my freshman year and asked the prof why winter storms tend to come up from Oklahoma. His reply was “I have no idea.”

    1. Greg Shoup says:

      Pete are you serious? Wow, I won’t ask what university you attended but these storms are common place around these parts. In fact, the 1978 famous blizzard was one of these storms. These storms are text book to be blunt. Here’s a fun link to read about them http://www.weatherology.com/blogs/189/panhandle_hook.html. When I was in school and over the years we used to call them “Oklahoma hookers”. I never used this term on the air but when I was the Chief at another station one of my young weekend meteorologist decided to. I still cringe when I think about it, but she must have done something right because she works in Cleveland now. But just to be clear the text books call them “panhandle hooks” because the originate from the Texas, Oklahoma panhandle. Here’s one more thing about this system to muddy the water even more, This system is moving through the “hook” region but strictly by definition it probably does not qualify as a panhandle hook storm since it moved across the southern Rockies.